Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum

Macronous gularis (Horsfield, 1822)

Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum/Division:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Timaliidae
Genus:Macronous
Species:M. gularis
Common Names:Pin-striped Tit-babbler, Striped Tit-babbler
Status:Common resident

Distribution

This species ranges from Nepal, south China, Indochina, Anambas Islands, to Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Sumatra, Borneo and Sulawesi.

Localities

This species can be found throughout Singapore and its offshore islands.

Locality Map

General Biology

The Striped Tit-Babbler is commonly seen in secondary growth, forest edges, occasionally in mangrove forests. This species is very sociable and moves noisily in small family or social groups through the mid-canopy. A harsh, scolding call is often uttered when there is an intruder in its territory.

It has a distinctive call that has been documented in video HERE.

A video of a pair was seen bathing in a tree hole filled with water, folllowed by preening to get the barbs and barbules proerly aligned.

An image of the small Pin-striped Tit-babbler feeding the chick of a very much Drongo Cuckoo (Surniculus lugubris) can be seen HERE. Once the egg of the cuckoo hatches in the nest, it will throw out the host's egg or even the young chick. This will ensure the foster parents will pay full attention to the cuckoo chick.

Observations of an adult catching a beetle and retaining it in its bill when preening may indicate that the Pin-striped Tit-babbler may be indulging in anting. According to Collar & Robson (2007), anting and anting-like behaviour are often seen among tit-babblers.

References

Collar, N. J. & C. Robson, 2007. Family Timaliidae (Babblers). In: del Hoyo, J., A. Elliott & J. Sargatal (eds.). Handbook of the birds of the world. Vol. 12. Picathartes to Tits and Chikadees. Lynx Editions, Barcelona. Pp. 70-291.

Wang, L. K. 2011. Babblers. Pp. 233. In: Ng, P. K. L., R. T. Corlett & H. T. W. Tan (editors). Singapore Biodiversity. An Encyclopedia of the Natural Environment and Sustainable Development. Editions Didier Millet, Singapore. 552 pp.

Wang, L.K. & Hails, C.J. 2007. An annotated checklist of birds of Singapore. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology, Supplement 15: 1–179, Singapore.

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