Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum

Gracula religiosa Linnaeus, 1758

Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum/Division:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Passeriformes
Family:Sturnidae
Genus:Gracula
Species:G. religiosa
Common Names:Hill Myna, Talking Myna, Grackle, Tiong Emas, Burong Tiong
Status:Uncommon resident

Distribution

The species ranges from the Indian subcontinent, south China to Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Sumatra, Java, Bali, Borneo, Palawan and the Lesser Sundas.

Localities

Bukit Batok Nature Park, Bukit Timah Nature Reserve, Central Catchment Nature Reserve, Pulau Tekong, Pulau Ubin, Singapore Botanic Gardens, St John's Island

Locality Map

General Biology

The Hill Myna is found in small numbers in the forest canopy and open forests with isolated tall trees. It is a popular caged bird and occasioally sightings of escapees can be seen in parks and open country.

As with all other birds, this myns will indulge in comfort behaviour like preening, stretching, etc. most of the time - or the male preening the female as a means of bonding. They have even been documented casting pellets.

Hill Myna is a great mimic. Its melodious and shrill whistle can continue to include the tinkling of bells, metal striking against metal, mooing of a cow, mimicking other birds' calls... as can be heard in this video clip.

Diet

This myna has been known to raid other bird's nest for the eggs - see HERE.

Life Cycle

Nest inspection has been observed in January and March. Nest building has been recorded in January. 

References

Wang, L. K., 2011. Mynas. Pp. 388–389. In: Ng, P. K. L., R. T. Corlett & H. T. W. Tan (editors). Singapore Biodiversity. An Encyclopedia of the Natural Environment and Sustainable Development. Editions Didier Millet, Singapore. 552 pp.

Wang, L. K. & C. J. Hails, 2007. An annotated checklist of the birds of Singapore. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology, Supplement 15: 1–179.

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