ANNOUNCEMENT The Museum is closed from 26 March 2020. A re-opening date will be announced on our website and social channels once confirmed.
Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum
Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum

Visiting Scientist Feature – Dr. Michael Gates

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Visiting Scientist Feature – Dr. Michael Gates


Earlier this week, we hosted Dr. Michael Gates, research entomologist with the Systematic Entomology Laboratory (SEL) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA); he is also an adjunct scientist at the Smithsonian Institution. Dr. Gates is an expert in the study of parasitoid wasps from the order Hymenoptera, having 23 years of research experience

The Guardian of the Zoological Reference Collection – Mrs. Yang Changman


Every year on 18 July, the United Nations observes Nelson Mandela International Day, commemorating his life and legacy and calling for people all over the world to make a difference in their community. On this day, we would like to dedicate a post to Mrs. Yang Changman, former curator at the Department of Zoology at

Visiting Scientist(s) Feature – Dr. Daisy Wowor and Dr. Win Mar


Dr. Daisy Wowor (left) and Dr. Win Mar (right) examining freshwater shrimp specimens in the LKCNHM research lab. Over the past three weeks, we have been hosting Dr. Daisy Wowor and Dr. Win Mar, who are both here to work on freshwater decapod crustaceans. Dr. Wowor is a Senior Researcher at the Research Centre for

The Road to RIMBA (IV) – In the Field


This post is the last of a four-part series documenting the inaugural RIMBA-Sarawak project expedition. View of Sungai Engkari from the landing point at Nanga Segerak Field Station. Photo credit: LKCNHM. After an exhilarating journey on wheels and longboat, the LKCNHM team have reached the Nanga Segerak Field Station. This is where the actual work

Visiting Scientists Feature: Ichthyologist Edition


Recently, we hosted ichthyologists Dr. Helen Larson and Dr. Kevin Conway. Dr. Larson is an old friend of the museum, having visited numerous times prior. On the other hand, this is Dr. Conway’s first visit to LKCNHM, despite having ties to the museum as an Associate Editor for the Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. During their

Visiting Scientists Feature: Students from the Iligan Institute of Technology


Over two weeks following the CNY holidays, the LKCNHM research lab was ablaze with the enthusiasm and lively chatter from a group of graduate students from the Iligan Institute of Technology, Mindanao State University, in the Philippines. The exuberant group of four—Ms. Meriam M. Rubio, Ms. Ziljih S. Molina, Mr. Jemateo B. Neri, and Ms.

Visiting Scientists Feature: The van der Poortens


Last Tuesday, renowned butterfly experts George and Nancy van der Poorten dropped by the museum for a quick visit! The van der Poortens have been commissioned to undertake the revision, and production of a 5th edition of the book – Corbet and Pendlebury’s ‘The Butterflies of the Malay Peninsula’. The 4th edition of the book was

Visiting Scientist Feature: Mr. Halmi Insani


Last week, we hosted Mr. Halmi Insani, a PhD student at Kyoto University’s Primate Research Institute. Halmi is working on identifying all non-human primates (living and fossilised) in Southeast Asia, as part of his thesis on the evolution and adaptation of primates. One of the primate fossils to be identified was excavated from Java, Indonesia

Stories from Christmas Island – The elusive Labuanium vitatum


Somewhere in Christmas Island resides a cryptic tree-climbing crab (Labuanium vitatum), commonly known as the white-stripe crab. With bright purple claws, a purplish body and neon-yellow eyes, it should not be hard to spot. However, even the most seasoned crab catcher has had no luck finding it. The head of the museum, Prof. Peter Ng,

Visiting Scientist Feature: The Earl of Cranbrook


Before the Lunar New Year, we hosted a very special guest – the Earl of Cranbrook! The Earl is a long-time friend of the museum, having popped by numerous times since his first research visit in 1956 – way back when he was better known to biologists here as Lord Medway. This time, his visit is