Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum

Tan Ming Kai

Description

Tan Ming Kai is currently a Life Sciences undergraduate in National University of Singapore (NUS). He has an interest in Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets and katydids) since young. In 2009 after his ‘A’ Levels, Ming Kai started collecting and studying them from a vacant site beside his junior college (Temasek Junior College). Through support from Robin Ngiam (National Biodiversity Centre, NParks) and friends, he continued his study in the Bukit Timah and Central Catchment Nature Reserves and various parks around Singapore.

Ming Kai’s main interest lies in the taxonomy of Orthoptera. To date, he has described four new species of crickets and katydids from Singapore, and currently working on a number more. Notably, he has also rediscovered and redescribed the Missing Marvellous Katydid (Asiophlugis thaumasia)

Publications (in chronological order)

Gorochov, A. V. & M. K. Tan, 2011. New katydids of the genus Asiophlugis Gorochov (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae) from Singapore and Malaysia. Russian Entomological Journal20(2): 129–133.

Ingrisch, S. & M. K. Tan, 2012. New taxa of Agraeciini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) from Singapore and Malaysia with a review of the genus Jambiliara. The Raffles Bulletin of Zoology, 60(1): 137–155.

Tan, M. K., 2012. New species of Glenophisis (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Hexacentrinae) from Singapore, with key to species. Zootaxa, 3185: 64–68.

Tan, M. K., 2012. Orthoptera in the Bukit Timah and Central Catchment Nature Reserves (Part 1): Suborder Caelifera. Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, National University Singapore, Singapore. 40 pp. Uploaded 4 May.2012.

Tan, M. K., R. W. J. Ngiam & M. R. B. Ismail, 2012. The ground-dwelling songsters of the insect world. Nature Watch, 20(1): 8–13.

Tan, M. K., R. W. J. Ngiam & M. R. B. Ismail, 2012. A checklist of Orthoptera in Singapore parks. Nature in Singapore, 5: 61–67.

Tan, M. K., 2011. The Copiphorini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) in Singapore. Nature In Singapore, 4: 31–42.

Tan, M. K., 2011. The species of Asiophlugis Gorochov, 1998 in Singapore (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae). Nature In Singapore, 4: 233–239.

Tan, M. K., 2010. Orthoptera of the vacant lots in Bedok South. Nature In Singapore, 3: 69–81.

Tan, M. K., 2010. Orthoptera in Pulau Ubin. Nature In Singapore, 3: 245–268.

Tan, M. K. & L. K. Wang, 2012, The orthoptera of Semakau Landfill, Singapore: a Project Semakau checklist. Nature In Singapore 5: 309–318.

Related Images

Related Documents

  • A checklist of Orthoptera in Singapore parks.
    Tan, M. K., R. W. J. Ngiam & M. R. B. Ismail (06 Mar 2012)

    The diversity of Orthoptera of urban parks in Singapore is inventorised. At least 61 species of Orthoptera were recorded from eight parks: Admiralty Park, Ang Mo Kio Town Garden West, Bukit Batok Nature Park, East Coast Park, Kent Ridge Park, Labrador Nature Reserve, Pasir Ris Park, and Sengkang Riverside Park.

  • New taxa of Agraeciini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) from Singapore and Malaysia with a review of the genus Jambiliara.
    Ingrisch, S. & M. K. Tan (29 Feb 2012)

    Four new species of Agraeciini from Singapore and Peninsular Malaysia are described: Nahlaksia bidadari n. sp. (Singapore, Pahang), Oxylakis singaporensis n. sp. (Singapore), Jambiliara angula n.sp. (Penang), and Jambiliara selita n. sp. (Singapore, Perak). The first record and description of males of the genus Jambiliara is given. The genus is reviewed, a key to the species provided, and one species transferred to the genus Mesagraecia Ingrisch, 1998 as Mesagraecia laticauda (Karny, 1926), new combination.

  • Orthoptera in the Bukit Timah and Central Catchment Nature Reserves (Part 1): Suborder Caelifera.
    Tan, M. K. (04 May 2012)

    This publication reviews the diversity of Caelifera from the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve (BTNR) and Central Catchment Nature Reserve (CCNR) of Singapore. The suborder Caelifera, commonly known as the grasshoppers, belongs to the order Orthoptera of the class Insecta in the phylum Arthropoda. This publication represents the first of a few revisions on the diversity of Orthoptera from the BTNR and CCNR. Collections and a number of publications on the Orthoptera in BTNR and CCNR were made primarily by D. H. Murphy in the 1970s (Chan, 1991). Although these works remain impressive and important to date, the checklists may have become outdated.

    In this book, preliminary results from 12 months of survey and collections between October 2010 and September 2011 are reported. An inventory and morphological keys for different families and subfamilies of the Caelifera are included. The compilation of these findings aims to increase the scientific and communal attention to the diversity of Caelifera in Singapore and their conservation needs, as well as to provide fundamental information necessary for effective protection and conservation of Orthoptera (Hoekstra, 1998). Colour plates illustrating the habitus and diagnostic characters are presented to aid in species identification, and hopefully, to help dispel the public’s general perception of grasshoppers or locusts as harmful pests (Hoekstra, 1998). The purpose of this publication is to reach out to locals, professionals, and the laymen, to discover and explore the Orthoptera in Singapore ―"with a sense of wonder but a touch of concern" (Rentz et al., 2003: viii).

  • Orthoptera of the vacant lots in Bedok South.
    Tan, M. K. (12 Apr 2010)

    An inventory of common species of Orthoptera found in the wasteland vegetation in Bedok South is presented here. The wasteland vegetation sites are located along Bedok South Avenue 1 to the west of Temasek Junior College and along New Upper Changi Road to the south of the Tanah Merah MRT Station. With very few researchers currently working on Orthoptera in Singapore, much of the research cited in this paper, may unfortunately be outdated (Willemse, 1930; Chopard, 1931; Murphy, 1973) or may be more relevant to the orthopteran fauna of neighbouring countries (Bailey, 1979; Otte & Alexander, 1983; Kim & Kim, 2002; Rentz et al., 2003; Wang & Shi, 2005; Yin & Wang, 2005). Perhaps the most concerted effort to study the diversity of the Orthoptera in Singapore in recent times was conducted by Prof. D.H. Murphy in the 1970s (Chan, 1991). Nevertheless, surveys and collections were carried out mainly in the Bukit Timah and the Central Catchment Nature Reserves. These show that the understanding of the order Orthoptera in Singapore is limited. As a result, there is a risk that orthopteran species of Singapore may disappear before their existence can be documented. This is especially so where the wasteland sites under investigation in this paper are “living on borrowed time and awaiting development” (Corlett, 1992). Hence, the objectives of this paper are to highlight the existence of the diversity of the Orthoptera, even in relatively small and isolated wastelands in an urban heartland of Bedok South and to monitor and update the diversity status of the Orthoptera in Singapore.

  • Orthoptera in Pulau Ubin
    Tan, M. K. (07 Oct 2010)

    A preliminary inventory of the common species of Orthoptera found in vegetation in Pulau Ubin is presented here. In particular, managed and spontaneous vegetation along the Sensory Trail were investigated. Pulau Ubin, being identified as a nature area (URA, undated), may function as a wildlife refuge for orthopteran species that may otherwise be rare in the urbanised Singapore mainland. However, with an increase in the percentage of built-up area (Sha, 2002), urban development on the island remains a threat to the biodiversity in Pulau Ubin. Therefore, the objectives of the paper are to inform the public of the orthopteran diversity in Pulau Ubin as part of Singapore’s natural heritage and to emphasise the need to “hang on” to (Chang, 2005) that which remains.

  • The species of Asiophlugis Gorochov, 1998 in Singapore (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae).
    Tan, M. K. (01 Aug 2011)

    This paper reports the genus Asiophlugis Gorochov, 1998 in Singapore. Asiophlugis is a member of the subfamily Meconematinae Burmeister, 1838 (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). From orthopteran surveys in and around the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve (BTNR) and the Central Catchment Nature Reserve (CCNR), three species of the Asiophlugis were recorded. Asiophlugis thaumasia (Hebard, 1922), combinatio nova, also known as the Missing Marvellous Katydid (Davison et al., 2008), was rediscovered. A single male was previously collected and described in Singapore in 1922 (Hebard, 1922). This species was not reported since then and was listed in the Singapore Red Data Book as critically endangered or presumed nationally extinct (Davison et al., 2008).

    Based on D. H. Murphy’s orthopteran collections in the 1970s, a more common but different species of Asiophlugis was collected instead: Asiophlugis temasek Gorochov & Tan, 2011, which was only described recently (Gorochov & Tan, 2011). This paper also reports another species, Asiophlugis rete Gorochov, 1998, which was recorded for the first time for Singapore near the BTNR. These findings show that there is a dearth of knowledge on the Asiophlugis species in Singapore. In this paper, a provisional key to the Singaporean species of Asiophlugis is composed and the biology is briefly discussed. The national status and conservation needs of Asiophlugis are also examined.

  • The Copiphorini (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae) in Singapore.
    Tan, M. K. (10 Mar 2011)

    This paper attempts to document the taxonomy and biology of the tribe Copiphorini (Karny, 1912) in Singapore. The Copiphorini is a member of the subfamily Conocephalinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). From this preliminary survey, seven species from three genera were observed. The taxonomic treatment of the Copiphorini has, in some ways, been confusing and incomplete (Bailey, 1979; Rentz, 2010). This rather backward condition of the taxonomy of the tribe is mainly attributed to the lack of distinct diagnostic characters (Bailey, 1979). Moreover, little is also known about the biology of the Copiphorini owing to their marginal impact on economic crops (Willemse, 2001; Kim Tae-Woo, pers. comm.). Inadequate information about the life cycle, ecology, and behaviour of this tribe also makes progress in taxonomy difficult (Willemse, 2001). Reports on the Copiphorini in Singapore were published by Hebard (1922), and Murphy (1973) but only as parts of the orthopteran inventory. Thus far, there is no publication on the comprehensive study for the Copiphorini in Singapore. In this paper, diagnostic characteristics are re-examined and a provisional key to species of the Singaporean Copiphorini was composed. Additionally, notes on the biology of the Copiphorini in general are presented.

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