Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum

Himantopus himantopus (Linnaeus, 1758)

Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum/Division:Chordata
Class:Aves
Order:Charadriiformes
Family:Recurvirostridae
Genus:Himantopus
Species:H. himantopus
Common Names:Black-winged Stilt, Pied Stilt
Status:Uncommon winter visitor and passage migrant

Description

The legs of the Black-winged Stilt are longer than the body, and it has a long, thin and straight bill.

Size: 35–40 cm

Read more about the Charadriiformes order.
Read more about the Recurvirostridae family.

Distribution

Th Black-winged Stilt ranges widely from Hawaii, South USA, central and south America, southwestern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, easr to central Asia, north-central China, the Indian subcontinent, Indochina, Taiwan to Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Java, the Philippines, Sulawesi, Lesser Sundas, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand. Many populations migrate or disperse, reaching S China and SE Asia.

Localities

In Singapore, the Black-winged Stilt has been recorded at Changi, Lorong Halus, Punggol, Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve, Sungei Seletar, Tuas, West Coast.

Locality Map

General Biology

One or two birds are recorded occasionally in Singapore, where it is found in shallow prawn ponds, marshes, waterlogged grassland and reed beds.

Feeding strategy includes diving into the shallow water to pick up prey, probing into the soft stratum or scything through the soft mud with the bill slightly open.

Link to the common contact call of a single "kek" and the alarm call of "kikkikki" can be accessed HERE.

It often involves in aerial combat as a result of territorial claim or to protect the chicks.

Diet

Insects like water bugs, fish that it washes a few times before swallowing... 

References

Wang, L. K. & C. J. Hails, 2007. An annotated checklist of the birds of Singapore. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology, Supplement 15: 1–179.

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